Wow! Ogilvy Mumbai is Most Effective Agency Office globally as per Effie Index

19 Jun,2012

 

By A Correspondent

 

It’s decidedly one of India’s creative agencies and has also been very widely hailed as doing some exceedingly effective work for its clients. It wasn’t much of a surprise hence that when the global results of the Effie Effectiveness Index were released by Effie Worldwide and Warc yesterday, Ogilvy Mumbai was declared the Most Effective Agency Office globally in 2012

 

The index, launched in 2011, recognizes the architects of the most effective marketing communications ideas from around the world.

 

Talking about the recognition, Hephzibah Pathak, President, Ogilvy & Mather Mumbai, said: “This is brilliant news. A wonderful reward for the champions in Mumbai office and our great client partners and another testimony to the twin peaks of creativity and effectiveness.” Ogilvy & Mather Mumbai is the only Indian agency office to rank in the top 5 agencies globally.

 

Said Kawal Shoor, Head of Planning – Ogilvy Mumbai: “This recognition makes us even more proud of the stuff we do. We’ve always believed that to be truly effective you need to have an outstandingly creative and insightful piece of communication. This is a vindication of the relentlessness of our people, the confidence of our clients, and the sheer width and variety of the office’s skillsets.”

 

For the second year in a row, the WPP Group is the Most Effective Advertising holding company while Ogilvy & Mather is the Most Effective Advertising Agency Network.

 

Ogilvy Mumbai was also declared the Most Effective Individual Agency office in Asia Pacific in the 2011 Effie Effectiveness Index and ranked number 2 worldwide.

 

 

Meanwhile, Unilever is the most effective advertiser and McDonald’s is the most effective brand, for the second year in a row. McKinney (USA) is the most effective independently held advertising agency.

 

O&M Mumbai leads in the global individual office ranking. Sancho BBDO from Bogota, Colombia, which led last year, slipped to number 2 followed by Lowe-SSP3 (also from Bogota) and Ogilvy & Mather (New York). The top 20 also includes agencies from countries as diverse as China, Hong Kong, Australia, Argentina, New Zealand, Egypt, Peru, Ukraine and Israel.

 

 

WPP leads as the most effective holding company to be followed by Omnicom, IPG, Publicis Groupe and Havas Advertising.

 

 

While Unilever is the most effective advertiser, Procter & Gamble has lost its top position since last year and slipped to number 2. Nestle is at number 3 followed by McDonald’s at number 4 and Pepsico at number 5 in the list of top 5 most effective advertisers.

 

 

As for the brand, McDonald’s retains its numero uno position. Surprisingly, a technology company, IBM is the second most effective brand. Coca-Cola is at number 3 followed by Axe at number 4 and Pepsi at number 5.

 

 

The Index was launched in June last year and is led by Effie Worldwide.  It is said that the Effie Effectiveness Index will become the industry standard. The Effie Effectiveness Index identifies and ranks the marketing communications industry’s most effective agencies, advertisers, and brands by analyzing finalist and winner data from Effie Worldwide competitions. It is the world’s most comprehensive ranking of agency and advertiser performance and a valuable resource for anyone interested in marketing effectiveness.

 

The 2012 Effie Effectiveness Index is derived from almost 2,000 finalists and winning entries to Effie Award competitions worldwide between June 13, 2011 and June 12, 2012.

 

The Index is constructed by converting every Effie award and finalist into points – 12 for a Grand Effie, eight for Gold, six for Silver, four for Bronze and two for a finalist (with contributing agencies receiving half these points). In a change from the inaugural year, if several agencies from the same agency network or holding group worked on a campaign, the network and holding group only receives one set of points for each winning effort.

 

 

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